Monday, March 16, 2015

Stitch Fix number nine

Wow! I can't believe I just received my ninth Stitch Fix. I had just as much excitement seeing it on my front porch that I did when my very first fix arrived. With this fix, I didn't request anything in particular, unless you count asking for Kim (my favorite stylist) again. I did mention in my note that I had been in a funk so anything to get me out of it would be appreciated. As in something fun or different or colorful or something she knew I would fall in love with. 

As always, Kim succeed. She obviously knows I a) love dresses and b) have a weakness for polka dots. Item number one in the box was the Kensie Knox Polka Dot Dress: 
It has more of a casual vibe to it but with the right shoes and jewelry, it can definitely be dressed up. It is a beautiful mint green which nearly perfectly matches the color of Stitch Fix's logo. Coincidence? Maybe or maybe not. The polka dots aren't typical polka dots (you know -- a completely differently color than what the garment is such as a blue dress with white polka dots). The really fun part of the dress is this detail on the chest: 


Thankfully you don't have to unbutton/button all of them to get dressed. So, the verdict? Keep. (I will have to take it to the tailor though to take in the top/shoulder area).

The second item in the box was the Palo Collared Blouse by Staccato. Okay, so Kim can't be perfect. 


My first thought when I pulled it from the box was "Well, I'm in Oklahoma, I guess I'll be ready for rodeo now." Since my rule is to try everything on before deciding against something, I did try it on. It didn't fit me very well -- which tends to happen with button up shirts. Seriously, not sure why but that style of shirt just does not work with my body. This shirt was quite sheer but thankfully was sent with a white cami. The verdict? Send back. 

Item number three in the box was this Daniel Rainn Vivienne Floral Print Sleeveless Blouse: 


At first look, not quite my style (the floral) but the blue was so vibrant I wanted to love it and keep it. I tried it on and it wasn't too bad but it had an odd fit on my body and ended up looking a little too boxy for my liking. This shirt was sent with a matching blue cami to be worn underneath. Verdict? Send back. (I did feel a little guilty sending this one back)

The fourth item in the box was the Demi Fold Over Vegan Leather Crossbody Bag by Street Level


It is a beautiful color. Very similar to the Stitch Fix logo color and the dress sent in the box. I opened the box with my Mom via FaceTime and she loved this purse. I probably should have kept it and given it to her as a Christmas gift in 2015. I recently bought a new purse though (and the work that went into finding it was quite a bit) so I don't need a new purse. I'm horrible about changing out my purses. The other thing is I'm more of a satchel purse lady than one to use a cross body bag. Verdict: Send back. 

The last item in the box was the Woodland Scoop Neck Tee by Loveappella: 


I loved this shirt. It is a fun color and different from all of the basic fitted shirts I already own. I can see this as a staple for casual wear in my wardrobe -- with jeans, shorts or even skirts. It will also be a great piece for our family vacations to the Caribbean. The one thing I'm still unsure about is how the stripes wrap around to the bottom of the back of the shirt. 
Verdict: Keep it. 

Overall, it was a great fix. My next one will arrive in early May and I may be beyond excited for that one since Stit
ch Fix has expanded and now has petite sizes!!! The excitement I have for this is probably more than the excitement I had when The Limited announced it was going to offer petite sizes. I have no notes yet for my stylist of what I want or am looking for in my May fix so it will be a complete surprise unless something changes and I need to request something. 

If you liked my review and are now interested in trying Stitch Fix, please use my referral code: https://stitchfix.com/referral/3392664

You can always sign up, complete your profile and but not order a fix until you are ready. And if you are still unsure, go through my blog archive. There is a post for each of my previous fixes. 

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

To disclose or not?

I had to edit an article recently written by a human resources officer regarding hiring people with disabilities. The author spent some time discussing the American Disabilities Act. The author discussed the benefits outweighed any potential risks of hiring someone with a disability, how someone with a disability is often more reliable, etc.  

Are you aware diabetes is covered by the American Disabilities Act?

The Society for Human Resource Management states: 
 Although there is not an exhaustive list of disabilities under the ADA, as a result of the changes made by the ADAAA, the EEOC has published four Q&A Series guidance documents on medical conditions that would easily be considered a disability within the meaning of the law because they substantially limited a major life activity. Those medical conditions are:
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Intellectual Disabilities.
- See more at: http://www.shrm.org/templatestools/hrqa/pages/cms_011495.aspx#sthash.xZopKJG8.dpuf

Although there is not an exhaustive list of disabilities under the ADA, as a result of the changes made by the ADAAA, the EEOC has published four Q&A Series guidance documents on medical conditions that would easily be considered a disability within the meaning of the law because they substantially limited a major life activity. Those medical conditions are:
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Intellectual Disabilities.
- See more at: http://www.shrm.org/templatestools/hrqa/pages/cms_011495.aspx#sthash.xZopKJG8.dpuf
Although there is not an exhaustive list of disabilities under the ADA, as a result of the changes made by the ADAAA, the EEOC has published four Q&A Series guidance documents on medical conditions that would easily be considered a disability within the meaning of the law because they substantially limited a major life activity. Those medical conditions are:
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Intellectual Disabilities.
- See more at: http://www.shrm.org/templatestools/hrqa/pages/cms_011495.aspx#sthash.xZopKJG8.dpuf

So there you go, diabetes is covered. That is a good thing, right? It could be but it might not be. 

From the article I was editing, companies with more than 50 employees must prepare an affirmative action plan to track recruitment and hiring of individuals with disabilities. For 2015 plans, the goal was 7 percent. 

Okay, so that makes being covered by the ADA act a good thing because it could help put a person with diabetes in the "to-interview" pile. 

But do companies really follow these things? Also, will they just interview but not hire and then use it as a reason to not hire a person with diabetes? 

I've had to go through more than enough job searches (are they not some of the most exhausting thing?) and the majority of the time you have to complete a portion of the application regarding gender, race, veteran status and now, if you are protected by the ADA act. 

I'm probably not alone in struggling to answer the questions. Do I mark yes I am protected by the ADA act? It could potentially help me get to an interview (but shouldn't my amazing resume get me there anyway?) but it could potentially be used as a reason, at least subconsciously, to not hire me. If it is between two people and everything is the same except one person has diabetes and the other does not, I'd place all the money in the world that they will hire the person without diabetes. Stinks to admit that but it is reality, unfortunately. Or do I mark "I decline to answer" and potentially get lost in the shuffle? 

To me, it is a no-win situation. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.